(Mod)ified Texts

An Interivew with Craig Mod

Craig Mod is a thinker, speaker and writer on the future of publishing. As a publisher and developer, currently with Flipboard, he is also directly shaping how we will experience publishing.

クレイグ・モドは出版の未来について語る、思想家、演説家、作家である。彼は発行人、デベロッパーとしてiPadのFlipboardに関わりながら、私たちがいかに出版に接していくかを形作っている。

Japan has one of the richest traditions of literature and the printed (or calligraphied) word. Even today, despite Japan’s affinity for gadgets, the print industry seems more resilient than other countries. Where do you see Japan’s print industry heading? And where do you see innovation in publishing here?

Japan! It’s true. Japan does paper beautifully. It’s the reason I’ve tried to have all the books I’ve designed and produced over the last decade printed there. You pay a premium for it, but the output is usually heads and tails above most other printers with whom I’ve dealt.

Japan really understands materials and their effect on experience. Tanizaki’s in Praise of Shadows, for example, is an entire book turning light into a material.

I’m curious to see what manga artists will be able to do with tablet reading as the medium matures. A lot of the balance, nuance and typographic weightlessness of Japanese design is dependent on a high-resolution canvas. The current spate of iPad/Android tablets simply don’t have the screens to support nuance. I think that with retina display iPads we will see more “Aha!” moments of print designers getting excited about digital publishing. Screens will never rival the tactility of paper, but with the right resolution, something magic happens as the pixels disappear.

Where are things headed? I frankly don’t know. I do know that the printing districts in the back streets of Kagurazaka, Edogawabashi, Hongo— all of Bunkyô-ku, really— are slimming. Printers tell me there’s less work. Walking around them, there’s a palpable sense of slowing down.

That said, you still find these amazing artisinal print shops. I have a Japanese designer friend who runs a small outfit in the quiet back streets of Asakusa. I get my black and white digital photography printed at a little anonymous shop near a small river running back behind Ginza.

So, while there will be an inevitable slimming, I don’t see small, boutique outfits like these ever disappearing.

You’re a big proponent of the power of technology to shape publishing. Some people think technology is changing publishing in very negative ways. What are some of the positive things that technology provides to publishers and readers alike?

Digital removes the cost of physical production, the cost of distribution, and the jockeying for premium placement in physical stores. These systems were necessary for physical items, but are ultimately extremely inefficient and costly (and wasteful).

If you consider the fundamental role of a publisher as a connector between readers and writers, then nearly everything about digital publishing improves the efficiency of creating that connection. Readers are already closer to authors.

For years, Murakami Haruki ran a very intimate website (in the late 90s, early naughts, I believe) between himself and his readers. As did William Gibson. Ultimately, these efforts proved to be unsustainable in the face of continuing to write novels. But, the point is, readers and authors are actually much closer now, thanks to blogs, Twitter (Paulo Cohelo, for example is a prolific tweeter), etc.

Can technology improve literacy?

Absolutely. The cornerstone of literacy is access to reading materials. John Wood’s A Room to Read is a beautiful non-profit that builds libraries in developing nations. But, what’s tough about building libraries in a village on a mountain? Getting books there. Books are trees. So you’re dragging trees up a mountain. On a donkey. And trees cost a lot of money to ship.

The Kindle was $399 in November 2007. $359 in February 2009. $299 in July 2009. $259 in October 2009 and then dropped to $139 in August 2010. It’s now even cheaper (subsidized partly by ads). How long until eInk Kindles drop to the price of a hardcover?

You can read on a Kindle easily for a week without recharging the battery. And recharging is a quick process. How small and cheap is a solar charging device fit for a Kindle? Kindles are also rough. You can throw ‘em around. Bang ‘em up. They don’t break. You can read them in the sun. How many Kindles do you need for a village? How much would that cost? For the cost of sending a library worth of physical books to a village, to how many villages can you send a dozen Kindles loaded with a library worth of books and a solar charger?

With print-on-demand and various digital publishing platforms (like Nook, Google Books, Kindle), anyone can publish a book. Are literary agents a dying breed? And publishing houses?

I hope not. Anyone can publish a book, but to do it well you need to have a good editor. You need guidance. You need an audience. Not every author will be able to assemble those things on her own. Nor will every author want to deal with the mechanics of producing ebooks.

If, as you say, the future of publishing is in technology, then the most technologically advanced cities and countries would seem to have de facto control of the shape of publishing. How will poorer countries and individuals be able to participate in the future of publishing?

As I mentioned earlier, as the cost of new publishing technologies drops to zero, my hope is that poorer countries will see a trickle down of these new technologies more quickly.

Bill Clinton wrote his memoirs by hand. How cool (or crazy) is that? And with Japanese authors, the physical manuscript is often displayed as an authentic artifact, almost fetishized, quite separately from the book that later goes into print (or digital). What are your thoughts on the act of physically writing and the sanctity of the manuscript?

The way we think is influenced by the medium atop which we are thinking. Try writing with a typewriter. You’ll find your thoughts wrapping up as you get closer to the edges of the paper. Your words change to fit the paper. Writing in cursive evokes phrases different than in block characters.

I’m sure folks complained about the loss of authenticity in artifact with the advent of the typewriter. A typewritten page is infinitely less personal than one handwritten. And now, we look at the typewriter with glint of romanticism in the context of the hyper sterility of computers.

With any medium, though, if you look hard enough you can always find something to fetishize. Current document revision technology allows us to capture the history of a text. It’s possible to scrub back through time— to literally watch an author make additions and deletions and modifications, to surface, as it were, the very intimate core of their writing process.

With digital text, we may lose that romantic sense of tangible artifact; we may lose the humanity of hand-made marks on paper; but it’s arguable that there is something greater— more romantic, if terrifying— in voyeuring on these peripheries of what comes with digital.

日本には、文学作品と活字文化の豊かな土壌があります。新しい物を追求する国民性を持ちながら、世界のどの国よりも従来からの印刷業が長く生き残っているという一面も持っています。日本の印刷業界の今後の展望についてどのようにお考えですか?また、日本の出版業界の技術革新とはどのようなものでしょうか?

そうですね。まず日本の出版物について思うのは、日本の書籍は装丁が素晴らしいということです。私が過去10年間に日本で制作に携わった書籍を全て持っておきたいと思う理由はそこにあります。豪華な装丁が施された書籍は高価ですがそれに充分見合った価値のある、美しいものです。

そして日本人は物質の特性を熟知し、それを上手に利用する事を知っています。例えば谷崎潤一郎の随筆「陰翳礼讃」は光を物質化して官能的に表現した名作です。

メディアの更なる発達によってタブレット型端末で漫画が読まれることが普通になったとき漫画家たちはどんな新しい表現が出来るようになるでしょうか? 日本人のデザインの優れたバランス感覚や細かいニュアンスが伝わるかどうかはタブレットの画質次第といえるでしょう。しかし最近流行のiPadやアンドロイドなどのタブレットでは細かいニュアンスまでは伝わりません。 iPhoneが採用しているような超高画質RetinaディスプレイをiPadも採用すればデジタル出版を行うプリントデザイナーも細かいニュアンスが伝えられるようになるのではないでしょうか。コンピューターの画面は紙の持つ繊細な触知性を持ち得ませんが、新しい技術をうまく応用すればかなり近いところまで改善できると思います。

業界の今後については正直なところ先行き不透明です。しかし、神楽坂や江戸川橋、本郷など文京区の裏通りあたり、印刷屋が多く見られるエリアはどこもひっそりとしていますし、そこで働く人たちも口をそろえて仕事が減ってきていると言っています。

とはいえ、素敵なプリントショップが頑張って生き残っていることも事実です。僕の日本人の友人は浅草の裏通りの閑静な立地で小さな印刷会社を経営していますし、僕がデジカメで撮ったモノクロ写真は銀座の裏通りでひっそりと営業しているプリントショップでプリントしています。

今後も業界の規模が縮小していくことは避けられそうもありませんが、これら小規模の専門店は今後も生き残っていくだろうと思います。

あなたは出版業界におけるテクノロジーの応用を提唱していらっしゃいますが、テクノロジーの進歩は出版業界にとっては逆風になると考える人も多いようですね。テクノロジーの進歩が出版業界や出版物の読者たちにとってプラスとなる面はどんなところだとお考えですか?

出版物のデジタル化により生産コスト、流通コスト、過剰在庫の問題などが解消されます。読者と書き手をつなぐのが出版社の役目だとすれば、デジタル出版の普及によってより効率的に読者と書き手が結ばれるようになります。現状を見ても以前と比べて読者と書き手がより近いところに居ることがお分かりいただけると思います。

例えば村上春樹は長い間、彼自身と読者を結ぶウェブサイトを開設していましたし、アメリカの作家ウィリアム・ギブスンもウェブサイトを開設し、読者との交流を深めました。彼らの場合は多忙な著作活動の中で結局はサイトの運営も中断を余儀なくされましたが、ブログやツイッターの普及(例えばブラジルの小説家パウロ・コエーリョはツイッターの熱心なユーザーとして知られる)により読者と書き手の距離が縮まってきている事は確かです。

テクノロジーの進歩は人々の読み書き能力の向上に寄与し得るでしょうか?

それは間違いありません。読み書き能力は読み物を入手しやすい環境が整っているか否かに掛かっています。マイクロソフトの幹部社員だったジョン・ウッドにより設立された非営利団体「ルーム・トゥ・リード」は開発途上国の恵まれない子供たちに対して本を寄贈したり図書館を建設したりしていますが、開発途上国の山間部の小さな村に図書館を造ろうとするとき何が一番問題になると思いますか? それは現地にたくさんの図書を運搬するためのコストです。それは材木を山の上に運び上げるのと同じくらい大変な仕事です。車も入って行けないような山間部にはロバに乗せて運ぶのですが、これには大きなコストが掛かっています。

一方、米国アマゾン社が発売した携帯型電子書籍端末「キンドル」の値段は発売当初の2007年11月には399ドルもしましたが、2009年の2月時点で359ドル、同年7月には299ドル、10月には259ドル、そして2010年の8月には139ドルまで価格が下がり、随分入手しやすくなりました。

広告収入のお陰もあって今ではさらに入手しやすい価格となっています。キンドルの価格がハードカバーの書籍の価格くらいまで下がる日も近いでしょう。

しかもキンドルは1回の充電で1週間は作動します。充電は簡単に出来ますが、太陽光で充電できるようになればさらに便利になるでしょう。キンドルは作りも頑丈で少々手荒に扱っても壊れません。太陽の下でも読みやすいディスプレイの性能も素晴らしい。

ひとつの村に何個のキンドルが必要だと思いますか?コストはどのくらいになると思いますか? 実際、ひとつの村に図書館を建設してそれなりの蔵書を揃えるほどの予算があれば1ダースのキンドルをたくさんの村に配布することができるのです。

オンデマンド印刷機や各種電子出版プラットフォーム(「ヌーク」「Googleブックス」「キンドル」など)があれば誰でも書籍を発刊できますね。そうなると著作権代理業者や出版社は廃業するしかないのでしょうか?

そうならないことを願っています。電子出版は誰でも出来ますが、商売としてうまくやるには有能な編集者が必要ですし、ガイダンスも無しではうまく行かないでしょう。また、出版してもそれを読んでくれる人がいなければ何にもなりません。一人で全てをやるのは大変なことです。電子出版のためのこれら必要な事を煩わしいと感じる人は多いと思います。

あなたがおっしゃるように出版業界の未来が新しいテクノロジーに委ねられているなら、技術的に最も進んだ街や国が事実上業界をリードしていくことになりそうですね。後進の地域はどうすればいいですか?

先に申し上げたように、新技術を利用するコストは下がり続けていますから、資金力の乏しい国々も今後は新しい技術の恩恵にあずかるチャンスは増えてくると思います。

クリントン元大統領が自らの回顧録を手書きで残したことについてどう思われますか? 日本では人気作家の手書きの原稿が価値を持つものとして公開されたり、後に発刊される著作とは別個に崇められたりすることがありますが、手書きで執筆することや手書き原稿の価値についてどう思われますか?

私達が物事を考えるとき、その思考回路はどんな状況下で考えているかによって影響を受けます。例えばタイプライターで文字を打つときは「紙に文字を打っている」という視覚的な影響を受け、自然と考え方も文体もタイプライター向けになります。また手書きの場合も筆記体で書くときは楷書で書く時とは違う言葉が頭に浮かびます。

タイプライターが出てきたときは手書きの良さが失われた、と世間では言われました。確かにタイプされた文字は手書きの文字と比べれば個性がありません。しかし今日、コンピューターの普及でその無味乾燥な文字に慣れた私達はタイプライターで書かれた文字にロマンを感じたりするのです。

メディア媒体の種類が何であれ、言い換えれば最新のものでも古臭いものでも、いわゆるフェチの対象にはなり得るのです。

最新のテクノロジーによるドキュメント修正技術によれば、私たちは作成したドキュメントを時系列的に見直し、必要なら何かを追加したり削除したり修正を加えたりすることが出来ます。そしてそのドキュメントを見ればそこには書き手による書き込みの過程が見えます。

デジタル形式で作成されたものにはロマンチシズムが感じられないという人もいます。手書きの温もりが無いという人もいます。しかしデジタルの世界にフェティシズムを感じたり、物質化されていないデジタルな世界特有の、不気味にも感じられる匂いにロマンチシズムを感じる人もいると思うのです。