Miyakejima 三宅島

Text & photos: Daniel Simmons

It’s a rainy June morning in Miyakejima. I’m on a bus making a slow circumnavigation of the island, and the New Zealander sitting next to me is telling me about an acquaintance of his who moved here a few years ago to teach English. Before her arrival, the teacher was given a shopping list.

“The first thing she needed to buy,” the Kiwi tells me, “was a gas mask.”

I consider this. Outside the window, the Miyakejima coastline slides by in a long broken line of rocky beaches and volcanic mud cliffs, barely visible in the sheeting rain.

“The second thing she needed to buy,” the Kiwi continues, “was another gas mask. Just in case, you know, something happened while somebody else was visiting her. Only after that was she was allowed to buy a futon and the rest of it.”

Miyakejima is one of several lovely islets in Tokyo’s Izu island chain, but it comes with its own special curse: a volcanic landscape that belches out higher levels of poisonous sulphuric gas than almost any other place on earth. In 2000, a major eruption forced the evacuation of all the island’s residents, who were allowed to return only after several years had passed and the gas levels had lowered to semi-acceptable levels. All residents are required to carry gas masks with them at all times, and temporary visitors are welcome to blend in by purchasing their own masks at the Miyakejima Tourist Association store or the Takeshiba boat terminal in Tokyo. They are unsettling souvenirs, to put it mildly.

The expectorations of looming Mt. Oyama make for a surreal sightseeing experience, since evidence of past eruptions is everywhere. My rainy bus ride delivered me to a school complex destroyed by lahars, a shrine where only the very top of the old torii gate remains unburied, and hike-able sea cliffs stained purplish red by the presence of volcanic scoria.

Forbidding as the above-ground landscape can be, all that volcano action makes the underwater scenery around Miyakejima a divers’ wonderland. Lava flows have formed impressive arches and caves that shelter impressive varieties of schooling fish, lobsters, nudibranchs, and more. During our weekend there, we encountered colorful blacktip groupers, a dragon moray eel, and a Japanese bull shark.

No diving license is required to enjoy the area’s biggest underwater draw. Just a 50-minute boat ride away is the waterfall-streaked coast of neighboring Mikurajima, where snorkelers have the opportunity to swim alongside pods of wild dolphins that frequent the area.

After a day’s worth of ocean adventures are over, the charming Furusato-no-yu hot spring (¥500) near Ako Port provides welcome pre-sunset soaks.

The risk that a raid alarm might prompt a sudden island-wide grab for the gas masks doesn’t seem to faze the locals, who take great pride in their island hideaway. For Miyakejima residents, having a pesky volcano as a neighbor is just something that goes with the territory.

GETTING THERE:

Overnight ferries operated by Tokai Kisen depart from the Takeshiba Sanbashi pier in Tokyo at 10:30pm and arrive at Miyakejima at 5:00 the next morning. Airplane and helicopter transportation is also possible, poisonous gas clouds permitting.

For ferry info, see:
www.tokaikisen.co.jp/english/

One good tour operator is Dolphin Club Miyakejima. For details, see:
www.dolphin-club-miyakejima.com/eindex.html

6月の雨の朝、私は三宅島を走る路線バスに乗り、ゆったり島めぐりを楽しんでいた。隣に座ったニュージーランド人の知り合いには、英語教師として数年前にこの島に移住してきた女性が居るらしいのだが、その知人女性は三宅島に来る前に一枚の買い物リストを手渡されたという。

「買い物リストの最初に書いてあったのはガスマスクだったそうです」。

バスの窓の外は岩場の多い海岸と火山泥で形成された断崖が続いているが、激しい雨のせいで景色はぼんやりと霞んで見える。

「次に彼女が買わなければならなかったのは・・・」と彼は続けた。「予備のガスマスクだったそうです。もし彼女のところに誰かが来ている時に噴火が起きたらマスクが一つでは足りないということだったらしい。この島では布団などの日用品を買う前にまずガスマスクを購入しなければならないのです」。

三宅島は行政上は東京都に属する伊豆諸島の一つで、特にこの島の活火山は世界でも類をみないほど大量の火山ガスを噴出している。2000年に発生した大規模な噴火で全島民が島外への避難を余儀なくされ、その後火山活動がやや沈静化した2005年に避難指示は解除された。しかし現在でも全ての島民と一時的な観光客にガスマスクの携帯が義務付けられている。ガスマスクは竹芝桟橋の売店、羽田空港第2ターミナル内と島内の観光協会で販売しており、ちょっと変わった土産物にもなりそうだ。

島の最高峰、雄山周辺には到る所に噴火の痕跡が生々しく残り、現実離れした光景を作っている。私が乗ったバスの窓からは火山泥流によって破壊された校舎、鳥居の上部のみが残された神社、火山礫によって赤紫色になった海食崖などが見えた。

地上の風景は噴火の傷跡が不気味に映るが、周辺の海でスキューバダイビングを楽しむ人たちにとって、海底の光景は噴火によってむしろ魅力溢れるものになっているという。海に流れ込んだ溶岩が見事なアーチと洞穴をいくつも形成しており、たくさんの魚、伊勢エビ、ナマコ、などがそこを棲みかとしているのだ。私がスキューバダイビングを楽しんだ週末は、色鮮やかなアカハタ、トラウツボ、ネコザメなどにも遭遇できた。

スキューバダイビングを楽しむのに特別な資格は必要ない。三宅島から船で50分のところには御蔵島があり、周囲を絶壁で囲まれた独特の姿をしている。御蔵島周辺海域には野生のイルカが生息しているので、スノーケリングを楽しみながらイルカの群れと泳ぐことも可能だ。

三宅島周辺で海の冒険を一日楽しんだら、阿古地区にある「ふるさとの湯」(利用料500円)に浸かりながら夕暮れ前のひと時を過ごそう。

再び大規模な噴火が起きれば慌ててガスマスクを着けて避難しなくてはならないだろうが、島の人たちはそんな危険に日々怯えながら暮らしている様子はなく、むしろこの島を大変誇りに思っているようだ。厄介な火山の存在もいちいち気にしてはいられないのだ。

三宅島へのアクセス:東京竹芝桟橋から東海汽船のフェリーが毎日就航。出港は午後10時半、三宅島着は翌朝5時。空路はANAが羽田空港より毎日就航、また伊豆諸島の主な島々はヘリコミューターで結ばれている。

フェリーについて詳しくは、www.tokaikisen.co.jp

ドルフィンクラブ三宅島は便利なツアー・オペレーター。下記参照。
www.dolphin-club-miyakejima.com