Witbier in Japan

If any style of beer tastes like it was made for summer drinking, it’s Belgian White. This wheat ale of about 5% alcohol is usually brewed from half malted barley and half unmalted or malted wheat. It is fermented with Belgian Ale yeast, which leaves it tasting rather spicy, and traditionally witbier also contains coriander seeds and orange peel, which add to its flavor and aroma. Hopping is normally very low, contributing little aroma or bitterness.

White beer is, of course, not really white in color. It is, however, one of the palest yellow brews around, and is always unfiltered, so that the yeast in suspension gives the beer a whitish haze. The wheat also gives it a big, sturdy head, which is pure white. Wheat makes the beer light and soft, while giving it a tangy, fruity character that is extremely refreshing and is complemented nicely by the orange peel.

Witbier originated in the Middle Ages, in the Flemish areas of Belgium, where wheat was grown in abundance, and where spices could be obtained from nearby Holland. After a period of decline in the mid-20th century, the style was reborn in the 1960s in the guise of Hoegaarden, which is still the most widely-known Belgian White in the world. It is available all over Japan, though the present, industrially-brewed version is not what it used to be.

We don’t bother with this famous brand, however, as there are many better Japanese examples. Many of these use alternative spices and fruits. Hitachino Nest White Ale is well known: it includes nutmeg and orange juice for a tangy, spicy, full flavor, and is as popular in the USA as it is in Japan. Minoh’s Yuzu White contains fruit grown on mountains near the brewery, and recently won a gold medal at the World Beer Cup. It is pleasantly tart and dry, showcasing the yuzu, and super refreshing.

When it’s not quite so hot out, we sometimes prefer a more high-alcohol Wit, upwards of 7-8%, like those made by Isekadoya, Shimane, and Yokohama. Versions without additives are also getting more popular, often with dry hopping to provide the spicy, citrus character, as in Daisen’s recent White Nelson Sauvin.

In Japan and elsewhere, “Shiro biiru” is often marketed as a girl’s drink. While it may be true that many women like it, in a Japanese summer, Witbier is surely not just for the ladies.

This is shared content with Japan Beer Times: www.japanbeertimes.com

夏のために造られたかのようなビールスタイルがあるとすれば、それはベルジャンホワイトだ。アルコール度数5%程度の小麦のエールで、通常は大麦麦芽を半分、小麦麦芽または発芽させていない小麦を半分用いる。発酵に使われるベルジャンエールイーストが生み出すスパイシーな味わいに加え、伝統的なウィットビアではコリアンダーシードとオレンジピールがこのビール特有のフレーバーとアロマを与える。ホップ使いは通常とても小さく、アロマや苦みにほとんど影響を与えない。

もちろん、白ビールとはいえ本当の白色をしている訳ではない。実際は最も薄い黄色のビールで、沈殿物の中にあるイーストがビールを白く濁らせるように、ろ過はしない。小麦の影響で泡は白くて大きくしっかりする。そして小麦由来の、柔らかくタンジーでフルーティーなとても爽やかなキャラクターが、オレンジピールと抜群のバランスを取っている。

ウィットビアの起源は中世まで遡る。小麦が豊富に収穫でき、近隣のオランダからスパイスの入手も可能なベルギーフランドル地方で生まれた。20世紀半ばには一時落ち込んだが、1960年代にヒューガルデンが再び生まれ変わらせた。ヒューガルデンは最も広く世に知られるベルジャンホワイトで、日本でも全国で入手可能だが、現在の工業生産品としてのバージョンはかつての姿とは別物である。

この有名ブランドの話はここまでにしたいが、日本にはヒューガルデンより遥かに素晴らしい例が数多くある。そうした日本のビールは独自に異なるスパイスやフルーツを使っている。人気の高い常陸野ネストビールのホワイトエールは、ナツメグとオレンジ果汁を用いタンジーでスパイシーなフルフレーバーを持つ。日本国内と同じようにアメリカでも人気だ。箕面ビールのゆずホ和イトはワールドビアカップで金賞を獲得した。心地良い渋みとドライ感があり、柚子がはっきりとわかる超絶に爽やかなビールだ。

それほど暑くない時は、伊勢角屋、島根、横浜が造っているようなアルコール度数が高く7-8%もあるようなウィットもいい。一方、何も添加しないバージョンも徐々に人気を集めている。大山Gビールの「ホワイトネルソンソービン」のように、ドライホッピングでスパイシーさとシトラスのキャラクターを出したものが多い。

日本でも世界でも、「白ビール」は女子の飲むものとして広告販売されている。多くの女性が白いビールを好んでいるのは事実だろうが、日本の夏では、ウィットビアは女性だけのためにあるものではない。

この記事は、ジャパン・ビア・タイムズとの連動企画です。

by Mark Meli