Cotton Fields コットンフィールズ

If you live in Fukuoka, you either know or don’t know Cotton Fields. And if you don’t know Cotton Fields, do you really live in Fukuoka?

So the Zen koan might go for this unassuming little basement bar with a long history and interesting owner.

Moro’oka opened shop in December of 1980, when the red-light district of Nakasu was really booming. “It was like walking into a stadium when I went outside. The district was full of noise and energy.” The bubble years were just beginning. The streets were paved with money. But rather than open some lavish bar pandering to the deep pockets there, he stuck with a theme closer to his heart: Americana.

Country western and folk-roots music might seem like a natural enough fit for a man who started out doing engine care for trucks. After five years getting his hands dirty, he began studying as a chef and with one year under his belt, opened up a yatai, one of Fukuoka’s many famous food stalls on the street.

“I wanted to play music while I worked,” says Moro’oka in his distinct Hakata dialect, “and I liked the tempo of country. When I was young, there was a big country revival, too. So I served ramen and country.”

While he was running his yatai, he discovered dark beer, which changed everything for him. At the time, lagers were all that was widely available so the novelty of dark beer then shouldn’t come as a surprise.

After Moro’oka quit his yatai and opened Cotton Fields, he traveled to Tokyo to scour the department stores for unusual import beers. He bought what he could find there and in magazines, and then contacted many of the importers or producers directly to acquire more. Before long, his little “country style” bar in Nakasu was becoming a bona fide beer bar.

Moro’oka recalls an interesting period in his bar’s growth, “I remember the first time I tasted Budweiser. It tasted like apples to me, but I liked it. The bigger novelty was the twist-off cap. Those didn’t exist at the time and I always liked to set it on the table without a bottle opener to see if guests could figure it out. Later, they would then bring in their friends to show them the cool, new bottle caps.”

In the late 90s, long after the bubble had burst, Cotton Fields was still humming and the original dozen or so varieties of beer they started with had grown to a whopping 600 varieties. But Moro’oka began to cull the selection, claiming it was too hard to sell before the freshness expiration. At present they carry less than 400 but the selection is still impressive.

Moro’oka personally likes German beers, especially Oktoberfest varieties, and also reveals being partial to Samuel Adams and Brooklyn Lager, the latter being a big seller there. Tecate is popular, too. Beer geeks may scoff but Moro’oka relates, “When I first tasted it, I thought this would go well with lemon and salt. We started that in Japan. Then when I went to Mexico, I discovered that’s how they did it there, too—that was reaffirming for me.”

Another hot menu item is their locally famous rolled and fried tacos. “The sauce has 20 ingredients and I’m the only one that knows the recipe,” he smiles.

Wearing shorts and looking rather fit, Moro’oka seems much younger than his 62 years, but reveals his age when talking about some of the stars that have walked through his doors, including pop legend Fujii Fumiya while he was still with The Checkers. Other guests have been less illustrious.

“Once an Australian rugby team came in and got absolutely hammered. They were pissing in the glasses, which I decided to throw away,” he laughs.

One custom beer aficionados will appreciate is that Cotton Fields’ well-trained staff always leaves the bottles on the table until the customer’s evening is finished. Moro’oka believes that pouring the beer yourself and appreciating the label is an important part of the experience of drinking the beer.

After more than three decades of serving much of the world’s beer, he would know better than most. And though many guests may not like the country classics that still play in Cotton Fields, the style has stuck and will always be a part of this Fukuoka gem.

博多在住の人でコットンフィールズを知らない人がいるだろうか?というくらいの有名店。地下にある気取らない雰囲気のビアレストランだが、その長い歴史とオーナーのことについて知る人は少ない。

オーナーの諸岡がコットンフィールズをオープンしたのは1980年12月、九州一の歓楽街・中洲が本当の意味で賑やかだった頃にさかのぼる。「表に出たら毎晩お祭りみたいやったねえ。活気がすごかったよ」。一般的にはバブル前夜という時期だが、中州はすでに好景気に沸き、お祭り気分に浸っていた。しかし諸岡はその空気に便乗して高級な店を出すのではなく、彼の心の中にいつもあった「アメリカ的な雰囲気」にこだわった。

この世界に入る前、最初の仕事はトラックなどのエンジンを修理したりする技術屋さんだったという諸岡にとってカントリー・ウェスタンは元々自然にフィットする音楽なのかもしれない。5年間車関係の仕事をしたのち、料理の勉強を始めた諸岡は1年後、屋台をオープンさせた。「仕事中はやっぱり音楽を流したかったとよね」と彼は博多弁で話し始めた。「カントリーソングはテンポが好きやねえ。若い頃にカントリーミュージックの人気が再燃したこともあったし。それで屋台でカントリーソング流しながらラーメン出しよったと」。

諸岡は屋台時代に黒ビールに出会って衝撃を受けた。その当時はラガータイプが全盛だったので彼にとって黒ビールはとても斬新だったようだ。

屋台を閉め、コットンフィールズをオープンさせた彼は、ある時東京に行ってデパート巡りをし、目新しい輸入ビールを探して回った。東京のデパートや雑誌などで見つけたビールを買い求めるとともに、諸岡はたくさんの輸入業者にも直接コンタクトして色々なビールを揃えていった。こうして彼の「カントリースタイル」の店は本格的なビアレストランになっていった。

諸岡はオープン当時の面白いエピソードをひとつ聞かせてくれた。「バドワイザーを初めて飲んだ時にね、これはリンゴの味がすると思った。おいしかった。で、もっとびっくりしたのはネジ切りキャップ。その頃はそんなビールは無かったからお客さんに出す時に栓抜きは出さないでボトルだけ置いてね。お客さんもびっくりして、また次に来る時に友達連れてきて、これはこうやって開けるったい、って自慢するのが面白かったね」。

90年代も終わりの頃、バブルはとうに終わっていたが諸岡の店は順調に推移し続け、当初は10種類余りだったビールも一番多い時で600種類にもなった。しかしそんなにたくさん揃えても賞味期限内に全てのビールを売ってしまうことは大変で、諸岡は種類を減らすことにした。現在では400種類も無いというが、それでも大変な数である。

諸岡は個人的にはドイツビールが好みだという。特に好きなのはオクトーバーフェストらしいが、サミュエル・アダムスやブルックリン・ラガーも好きだという。店でもブルックリンは人気だそうだ。コットンフィールズではメキシコのテカテも相変わらずの人気銘柄。「初めてテカテを飲んだ時にレモンと塩を付けて飲んだら美味しいなと思ったとよね。このアイデアはこの店が日本では初めてじゃないかな。その後メキシコに行った時に現地でも同じ飲み方をしているのを見て、ああやっぱりねと思った」と説明してくれた。

そしてコットンフィールズが誇る人気フードメニューはなんといってもメキシカンタコス。
「タコスに付けるソースは僕が苦労して開発したオリジナルで、20種類の原材料を独自にブレンドしたもの。レシピは僕しか知らんとよ」と彼は笑いながら説明してくれた。

62歳だという諸岡はショートパンツをはき、元気そうで、随分若く見えるが、これまでに来店した有名人の話になるとさすがに長い歴史を感じさせる。チェッカーズ時代の藤井フミヤも来店したらしい。「オーストラリアのラグビーチームが来店した時は参ったねえ。酔っ払って大騒ぎしてビールグラスに小便するとよ。もちろんそれは捨てたけどね」。

コットンフィールズでは客が飲んだビールの空きビンはその客が帰るまでテーブルに置きっぱなしにしている。これはビール好きにはうれしいある種のサービスとなっている。自分でグラスにビールを注ぎ、飲みながら瓶のラベルを見て楽しむのも客の大きな楽しみだと諸岡は考えている。

世界のビールを提供し続けて30年余り経った今、諸岡が取り扱ったビールの種類は相当な数に上る。オープン当時から今も変わらず店内で流れ続けるオールド・カントリーは決して万人受けする音楽ではないが、博多が誇るこの名店の大事な雰囲気作りにこれからも変わらず貢献し続けてゆくだろう。