Jogashima 城ヶ島

by Daniel Simmons

Lovely Jogashima is little more than an hour’s journey from Yokohama, just off the southernmost tip of the Miura Peninsula, but its sea-carved bluffs and narcissus-and-pine-lined paths feel worlds apart from its big city neighbor.

The island, Kanagawa prefecture’s largest, was once a favorite cherry blossom-viewing destination of Kamakura shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo. The cherry trees are mostly gone now, but the hillsides are still abloom in most seasons: hydrangeas in June, lilies in July, and the island’s famous cultivated narcissus flowers in winter, all of them guarded by bamboo groves and gnarled Japanese black pine trees that stand stalwart against the sea winds. Here both sunrises and sunsets are tremendous, with views extending west to Mt. Fuji, east to the Boso Peninsula, and south to the vast Pacific. The island is only one square kilometer but a leisurely perambulation of its rocky shoreline will take at least a couple of hours, especially if you decide to picnic here or stop frequently for photos.

Certainly there is much to capture a photographer’s attention. The island is bookended by two picturesque lighthouses, one of them the second oldest in Japan (dating from 1870). Relentless Pacific waves have tunneled through a lonely finger of rock on the southern shore to form the striking Horseback Cave (馬の背洞門). A short walk away, cormorants nest among the guano-chalked crags, their long black necks angling back and forth in the sun. Kites, of both the manmade and avian varieties, wheel overhead through vibrant blue skies. And fishermen perch on scalloped volcanic promontories along the island’s west coast, waving their poles slowly back and forth like wands, casting languorous spells over the glittering deep.

For centuries Jogashima and the adjacent port of Misaki have been synonymous with fishing. The fish markets actually first opened here two thousand years ago but grew especially prosperous during the mid-17th century, when island fishermen began using larger-scale net captures to catch huge numbers of fish and rush them up the bay to customers in Edo.

The most popular seafood offering these days, advertised everywhere you look, is maguro, but visitors conscious of the global decline in tuna populations will find tasty menu alternatives at a restaurant called Seiryumaru in Misaki. (This suggestion comes courtesy of Sumiko Enbutsu’s Flower Lover’s Guide to Tokyo, an indispensable handbook for day trippers in the Tokyo area.) We especially recommend the chef-owner’s kinmedai, prepared in a “reishabu” that we’ve never seen elsewhere: strips of raw fish are dipped briefly in boiling water to scald the outside without cooking the inside, then served over ice in a bowl with side dipping sauces.

To reach Jogashima, take the Keihin Kyuko line from Yokohama to Misakiguchi terminal (about an hour, 550 yen). Catch bus #9 at stand 2 of the station’s bus terminal; half an hour later you can alight at the terminal near Jogashima lighthouse.

風光明媚な城ヶ島は三浦半島の南端にあり横浜からは1時間ちょっとで行ける距離だが、波の浸食によってできた海食崖、スイセンなどの海浜植物や松並木の小道など、島の景色は都会の喧騒とはかけ離れた別世界。

城ヶ島は神奈川県最大の自然島で鎌倉時代には源頼朝が桜見物のために度々来遊した。桜はほとんど現存していないが島の大部分を占める平坦な台地には四季折々の花が咲いて美しい。6月にはアジサイ、7月にはユリ、冬季にはスイセン、などが竹林やクロマツによって強い海風から守られ、美しい花を咲かせる。島内では素晴らしい日の出、日の入りの景色が楽しめ、はるか西方には富士山、東方には房総半島を望み、そして南方には広大な太平洋が広がる。面積は1㎢ほどだが、岩礁地帯の多い海岸の景色を楽しみながら歩いて島を1周するなら2~3時間は掛かる。

この島には写真家のハートをくすぐる魅力的なスポットがいっぱい。島には美しい灯台が2つあり、そのうちの1つ「城ヶ島灯台」は国内で2番目に古い灯台である(初点灯は1870年)。島の南部、赤羽根崎の突端には波による浸食によって岩がアーチ状にくり抜かれた馬ノ背洞門があり、見事な景観を作っている。ここから東側は海食崖が発達し人が容易に近づけないためウミウの繁殖地になっており、険しい岩場が彼らの糞で白く変色し、独特の景観になっている。真っ青な空にはトンビが舞い、島の西部、長津呂岬周辺の扇状の岩場が続くエリアは釣果を期待して磯釣りを楽しむ人も多い。

対岸の三崎と共に海を囲み、城ヶ島は古くから遠洋漁業基地三崎漁港の一角を成している。漁自体は弥生時代から行われていたが、江戸時代に網漁が始まったことで大量に水揚げされた魚介を当時の快速艇だった「押送り舟(おしょくり)」で江戸に運び始めた頃から城ヶ島の漁業は急速に発展した。

ここで獲れる魚介類のうち最も有名なのはマグロだが、世界的にマグロの漁獲量は減ってきている状況でもあるし、マグロ以外にも色々美味しいものがあるので試してみよう。お勧めは三崎漁港にある「成龍丸」という隠れた名店(圓佛須美子著「東京花めぐりガイド」より)。元漁師だったというご主人が作る「金目鯛の冷しゃぶ」はこれを食べないと夜眠れないというお客さんが居るほどの美味しさだ。

横浜から城ヶ島へのアクセスは、京浜急行で三崎口駅下車(550円、所要時間約1時間)、三崎口駅バスターミナル2番乗り場から9番線京浜急行バスに乗り、城ヶ島灯台近くの終点まで約30分。